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The Speculative Memory: Contextualising Memory in Speculative Fiction
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Keywords

Memory
speculative fiction
Memory Studies
Trauma
Identity

Categories

How to Cite

Dutt, S., & Mishra, P. (2024). The Speculative Memory: Contextualising Memory in Speculative Fiction. SOUTH INDIA JOURNAL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES, 22(2 June), 212-219. https://doi.org/10.62656/SIJSS.v22i2.375

Abstract

Memory, in literature and media, has been employed to analyse human conduct, interpersonal relationships, the historical past, and societal developments. It has, thus, emerged as one of the most important tools to trace and monitor the progression of the human condition. Memory has been utilised as a theme, a plot device, a foundational element, and much more to further the narrative of a story. Additionally, the speculative fiction genre strives to advance memory studies through its various works. Speculative worlds—at the intersection of race, gender, class, sexuality, and other similar social categories—portray complex systems of oppression and marginalisation. Analysing these systems through memory studies aids in a finer understanding of human notions of trauma, identity, belonging, history, and many more. This article explores how memory and speculative fiction intersect throughout literature, films, and television to understand how memory studies have shaped the genre discourse.

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References

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Ijabs, Ivars (2014), Collective memory, Encyclopaedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research, Springer Nature, pp 991–993.

Klein, S. B., and S. Nichols (2012), Memory and the sense of Personal Identity, Mind, 121(483), pp 677–702.

Nimbalkar, Namita (2011), John Locke on Personal Identity, Mens Sana Monographs, 9(1), pp 268-275.

Roediger, Henry L., and James V. Wertsch (2008), Creating a new discipline of memory studies, Memory Studies, 1(1), pp 9–22.

Smelik, Anneke (2009), The Virtuality of Time: Memory in Science Fiction Films, Technologies of Memory in the Arts, Palgrave Macmillan, pp 52–68.

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